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New Brunswick Genealogical Society, Inc.
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1.  
An acre is a square measure of land containing 10 square chains, 160 square rods, or 43,560 square feet.
[Located in Category: Land Records]
2.  
The method of survey using a combination of directional and distance measurements with references to natural and artificial objects, that define a tract of land is called "Metes and Bounds".
[Located in Category: Land Records]
3.  
Metes is a measurement of boundary lines in terms of their distance and direction.
[Located in Category: Land Records]
4.  
Bounds are boundries used to define the extent of a tract of land in metes and bound survey. May include natural and/or artificial objects and adjoining tracts of land.
[Located in Category: Land Records]
5.  
A cadastral map is a graphic illustration of land boundaries.
[Located in Category: Land Records]
6.  
The most important type of land record is a deed. The deed is a document conveying title of property from one party to another.
[Located in Category: Land Records]
7.  
Deeds establish proof of legal ownership of land.
[Located in Category: Land Records]
8.  
In Land Deeds, check to see if buyer and/or seller is from the same area where the land is being sold.
[Located in Category: Land Records]
9.  
Use land records to separate two persons of the same name in the same community.
[Located in Category: Land Records]
10.  
Genealogy is the search for our ancestors. Family history is the study of the lives they led. A true picture of the family is the result.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
11.  
Genealogy helps you to learn about your family and where you belong in that family.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
12.  
There is no greater legacy for your children and grandchildren than teaching them about the history and lives of their ancestors.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
13.  
Tracing the family medical history helps your children and grandchildren to take preventive measures with their own health
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
14.  
Because each generation doubles the number of ancestors, developing a plan of how you will proceed in your research in absolutely necessary
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
15.  
When you begin your genealogy research, focus on one or two families so you do not become overwhelmed. The other families will be there when you are ready for them.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
16.  
Everyone has a mother and a father. Female and male lines are equally important.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
17.  
A generation equals 22-25 years for a man and 18-23 years for a woman.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
18.  
Organize, organize, organize! You should be able to find information quickly. If your system doesn't work, change it ASAP!
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
19.  
When taking notes, use standard size paper, one surname per page, record source(s) so you can find it again and the date and place of your research.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
20.  
Use only accepted abbreviations (no homespun stuff).
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
21.  
Understand the basic terminology.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
22.  
The Pedigree chart is your road map. Begin with yourself. Use maiden names of married women.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
23.  
The Family Group Sheet identifies a couple and their children.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
24.  
Everyone has two family group sheets, one as a child with parents and one as a parent with children.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
25.  
A Chronological Profile begins with your ancestors birth. Fill it in with various life events as you discover them. Eventually, you will have a picture of your ancestor's life.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
26.  
Surname Sources The four basic groups from which surnames developed are patronymic, landscape features/place names, action/nicknames and occupational/office names.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
27.  
Think outside of the box for surname spelling variations. Surname spelling standardization didn't begin until the early 1900s. Many people were unable to read or write or spell!
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
28.  
The Research Log is very important for keeping a record of the source of every piece of information you collect
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
29.  
An ancestor is a person from whom you are descended. A descendant is a person who is descended from an ancestor. A relative is someone with whom you share a common ancestor but who is not in your direct line.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
30.  
Make a list of all your living relatives when starting your genealogy research. Interview every one of them.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
31.  
When interviewing a relative, etc., be prepared with a list of questions. Use a tape recorder or take very good notes. Respect the person's privacy.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
32.  
When writing to a relative for information, make specific requests and don't ramble! Offer to share your information.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
33.  
Remembering every letter you write is impossible. Use a Correspondence Log!
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
34.  
Write down your sources of information. Who/what told you? This is documentation. From this, you will be able to find the source again, if you need to do so.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
35.  
Soundex is a system of coding names for the census based on sound rather than alphabetical spelling.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
36.  
A variation of the Soundex called the American Soundex was used in the 1930s for a retrospective analysis of the US censuses from 1890 through 1920.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
37.  
There are various types of deeds to property. The most common are the warranty deed which transfers property with assurance of good title and the quitclaim deed which transfers one person's interest in the property without guarantee of good title.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
38.  
There are pay sites and free sites. The major pay site is ancestry.com.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
39.  
There are pay sites and free sites. The major free site is familysearch.org.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
40.  
Join a Mailing List. E-mails about subjects of the list will come to your e-mail box.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
41.  
Podcast is "a digital recording of a radio broadcast or similar program, made available on the Internet for downloading to a personal audio (or video) player."
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
42.  
Obituaries - don't limit your scope of your research to just the deceased. You may find a relative in the list of survivors or pre-deceased...or pallbearers. These clues help place your relatives at a specific place and a specific time in many cases!
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
43.  
The practice of double dating resulted from the switch from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
44.  
An ancestor is a person from whom a person is descended, e.g. parent, grandparent, great-grandparent.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
45.  
Banns of marriage are a public announcement in a Christian parish church of an intended marriage. The announcement is made three successive Sundays.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
46.  
Civil records are created by and for a governmental agency.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
47.  
An emigrant is a person who leaves a country to reside in another country.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
48.  
A Fact is something known to exist, be true, or have happened.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
49.  
Use timelines to find holes in your research.
[Located in Category: Basic Research]
50.  
The use of the term Junior did not always mean the son of. Sometimes it identified the younger of two persons in a locality with the same name
[Located in Category: Basic Research]